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Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: contradictions, critique and alternatives (Advanced study course)

Subject
Public Administration / global studies / International Development Studies / Politics and Administration / International Public Administration and Politics
Activitytype
master course
Teaching language
English
Registration

Tilmelding sker via stads selvbetjening indenfor annonceret tilmeldingsperiode, som du kan se på Studieadministrationens hjemmeside

Når du tilmelder dig kurset, skal du være opmærksom på, om der er sammenfald i tidspunktet for kursusafholdelse og eksamen med andre kurser, du har valgt. Uddannelsesplanlægningen tager udgangspunkt i, at det er muligt at gennemføre et anbefalet studieforløb uden overlap. Men omkring valgfrie elementer og studieplaner som går ud over de anbefalede studieforløb, kan der forekomme overlap, alt efter hvilke kurser du vælger.

Registration is happing through stads selvbetjeningwithin the announced registration period, as you can see on the Studyadministration homepage.

When registering for courses, please be aware of the potential conflicts between courses or exam dates on courses. The planning of course activities at Roskilde University is based on the recommended study programs which do not overlap. However, if you choose optional courses and/or study plans that goes beyond the recommended study programs, an overlap of lectures or exam dates may occur depending on which courses you choose.

Learning outcomes/assessment criteria

Knowledge - Specialised knowledge of a specific topic within International Development Studies. - Advanced knowledge of academic and methodological debates relating to the subject.

Skills

  • Skills in choosing relevant theories in order to investigate a selected area.
  • Skills in selecting and critically applying relevant theories and methods.
  • Skills in communicating and discussing theories and empirical results.

Competencies

  • Competency to take responsibility for and reflect on one’s own learning and that of colleagues by actively participating in group work, presentations and discussions.
  • Competency to independently select and utilise academic literature that is relevant to a specific issue.
Overall content

The object of the advanced study course is to provide students with advanced knowledge within a specific research area. At least two advanced study seminars are offered each semester. The themes may include:

  • Modern theories of the state in the Global South
  • Governance and economic transition in a globalised world
  • Migration and citizenship
  • Policies and practices in global health
  • Social, political and economic aspects of climate change
Detailed description of content

Modern mainstream economic theory is based on highly political assumptions, which are rarely challenged: dogmas of deregulation, mathematical models and austerity are treated as objective scientific facts, rather than ideological tools with a social and political history of their own. This course aims to repoliticize the study of economics and challenge the hegemony of neoclassical economic theory. This will be accomplished through a historical examination of the development of economic thought, and critical engagement with original economic texts. As such, the course objective is to understand the varied historical effect of these theories on both the object of study and the discipline itself.

The first part of the course “Economic Thought from Oikos to Economics” traces the history of economic ideas with an emphasis on critical and heterodox approaches. The individual sessions will introduce students to carefully selected primary literature from classical, critical and heterodox strands of economic thought. The objective is to understand the varied historical effect of these theories on both the object of study and the discipline itself. This will provide the foundation for further elaboration on contemporary issues such as debt, unemployment, inequality, and growth.

The second part of the course “Contemporary Challenges, Critiques and Alternatives” addresses present and pressing issues, through the lens of critical and heterodox political economy. This theoretical and applied pluralism will provide insights on issues such as e.g. the development crisis, financialisation, austerity politics and climate change, that are not conceptually possible if stricking to mainstream approaches. Through the employment of recent critiques, latter section of the course offers potential pathways towards different conceptualisations and alternatives to ‘the economy’ as we know it.

The course objective is to

  • introduce students to carefully selected primary literature from classical, critical and heterodox strands of economic thought
  • provide students with a thorough understanding of core concepts and debates in critical political economy
  • enable students to apply core theoretical and methodological aspects of heterodox perspectives to a given case-based event or process
  • encourage students to critically reflect on contemporary dynamics and developments in the global economy
  • address key methodological challenges linking theory and empirical research for critical analyses.
Teaching and working methods

The course is based on lectures, but will also encompass other forms of teaching and work, including group work, exercises, student presentations, peer feedback and field trips, as well as other practical activities.

During the course, an assignment is written on the basis of a question handed out at the start of the course.

Expected work effort (ects-declaration)

For Master-Level Participants

Class teaching: 30 hours

Other (for example student presentations, exercises, peer-review): 50 hours

Preparation: 135 hours

Examination: 55 hours

Hours in total: 270 hours

Course material and reading list

The full course outline will be available on the course website in May 2019. Course readings will be made available through a shared online repository. In the meantime, if you would like to read up in advance we recommend - Wood, E. M. (2002) The Origin of Capitalism. London. Verso. //this book is still one of the best and most concise introductions to capitalism and debates around it// - Stanford, J (2015) Economics for Everyone: A Short Guide to the Economics of Capitalism, Verso 2nd edition // A clear and uncompromising engagement with core dimensions of economics//
- Chang, H.J. (2014) Economics: The User’s Guide. Pelican. // very accessible introduction into some of the core dimensions and concepts in (global) political economy // - Fine, B. & Milonakis, D. (2009) From Political Economy to Economics: Method, the social and the historical in the evolution of economic theory. London & New York: Routledge // thorough and critical overview of the trajectory of theory and methodology of economic thought // - Pradella, L. & Marois, T. (2014) Polarising Development: Alternatives to Neoliberalism and the Crisis. Pluto Press. //a wide range of contemporary developments in global capitalism, with particular focus on agency and spaces of resistance and alternatives// - Selwyn, B. (2013) The Global Development Crisis. Cambridge: Polity Press. //brings together some of the core theoretical perspectives of the course with a sharp discussion of contemporary challenges//

Also recommended if you would like to read up in advance

  • Fine, B. & Milonakis, D. (2009) From Political Economy to Economics: Method, the social and the historical in the evolution of economic theory. London & New York: Routledge // thorough and critical overview of the trajectory of theory and methodology of economic thought //
  • Pradella, L. & Marois, T. (2014) Polarising Development: Alternatives to Neoliberalism and the Crisis. Pluto Press. //a wide range of contemporary developments in global capitalism, with particular focus on agency and spaces of resistance and alternatives//
  • Selwyn, B. (2013) The Global Development Crisis. Cambridge: Polity Press. //brings together some of the core theoretical perspectives of the course with a sharp discussion of contemporary challenges//
Form of examination

The examination is in two parts:

  1. Assignment written during the course. The first part of the examination is an answer to a question handed out at the start of the course. The maximum length of the assignment paper is 14,400 characters, including spaces. The size specifications include the cover, table of contents, bibliography, figures and other illustrations, but exclude any appendices. Assignments that fail to meet the size specifications will be refused assessment, and one examination attempt will be deemed to have been used up. The assignment is submitted during the final course session.

  2. The second part of the examination is a 48-hour written assignment. The 48-hour assignment is submitted after the final course session. The maximum length of the 48-hour assignment is 14,400 characters, including spaces. The size specifications include the cover, table of contents, bibliography, figures and other illustrations, but exclude any appendices. Assignments that fail to meet the size specifications will be refused assessment, and one examination attempt will be deemed to have been used up.

The assignments will be refused examination if one or both of them exceed the maximum size. A single overall grade is awarded. The two assignments have equal weight in the assessment. Failure to submit the first assignment on time will result in the student not being allowed to take the 48-hour examination, and one examination attempt will be deemed to have been used up.

Form of re-examination

Re-examination: The student must submit the first assignment within two weeks of the conclusion of the course. Previous assignments cannot be reused, and new questions may be set.

The second assignment in the examination is a 48-hour written assignment, and is taken in the re-examination period.

Re-examination otherwise has the same size requirements as the ordinary examination.

Examination type
Individual examination
Assessment
7-point grading scale
Moderation
None (i.e. course lecturer assesses)
Evaluation- and feedback forms

Feedback on 48hrs exam and newspaper assignment in office hour and or/email. Evaluation of course in final evaluation as well as concluding session.

The responsible course lecturer
Laura Horn (lhorn@ruc.dk)
Teacher
Mikkel Flohr (mflohrc@ruc.dk)
Administration of exams
ISE Studieadministration (ise-studieadministration@ruc.dk)
STADS stamdata
Sommerskole
Belastning : 10 ECTS Aktivitetskode : U40639
Prøveform : Skriftlig (ut) Bedømmelse : 7-trinsskala Censur : Intern censur
Last changed 03/04/2019

lecture list:

Show lessons for Subclass: 1 Find calendar (1) PDF for print (1)

Monday 29-07-2019 10:15 - 29-07-2019 17:00 in week 31
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Lecture 1 (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Tuesday 30-07-2019 08:15 - 30-07-2019 17:00 in week 31
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Lecture 2 (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Wednesday 31-07-2019 08:15 - 31-07-2019 17:00 in week 31
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Lecture 3 (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Thursday 01-08-2019 08:15 - 01-08-2019 17:00 in week 31
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Lecture 4 (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Friday 02-08-2019 08:15 - 02-08-2019 17:00 in week 31
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Lecture 5 (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Monday 05-08-2019 08:15 - 05-08-2019 17:00 in week 32
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Lecture 6 (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Tuesday 06-08-2019 08:15 - 06-08-2019 17:00 in week 32
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Lecture 7 (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Wednesday 07-08-2019 08:15 - 07-08-2019 17:00 in week 32
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Lecture 8 (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Thursday 08-08-2019 08:15 - 08-08-2019 17:00 in week 32
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Lecture 9 (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Friday 09-08-2019 08:15 - 09-08-2019 17:00 in week 32
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Lecture 10 (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Friday 09-08-2019 23:59 - 09-08-2019 23:59 in week 32
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Submission of written assignment (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Monday 12-08-2019 10:00 - Wednesday 14-08-2019 10:00 in week 33
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Exam: 48 hour written assignment (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Monday 26-08-2019 10:00 - 26-08-2019 10:00 in week 35
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Resubmission of written assignment (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)

Monday 02-09-2019 10:00 - Wednesday 04-09-2019 10:00 in week 36
Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism - Reexam (FORV, GS, IDS, IPAP, PA)