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Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: contradictions, critique and alternatives (Advanced study course)

Subject
Public Administration / global studies / International Development Studies / Politics and Administration / International Public Administration and Politics
Activitytype
master course
Teaching language
English
Registration

Please register via STADS-self-service within the annonced registration period, for more information see: https://intra.ruc.dk/en/students/student-hub/student-hub/ruc-uddannelsesjura-og-studieadministration/registration-periods/

Prerequisite for participation

Course participants are encouraged to keep an open and pluralist mind for the engagement with political economy. Prior knowledge is not required.

Learning outcomes/assessment criteria

The course objective is to - introduce students to carefully selected primary literature from classical, critical and heterodox strands of economic thought - provide students with a thorough understanding of core concepts and debates in critical political economy - enable students to apply core theoretical and methodological aspects of heterodox perspectives to a given case-based event or process - encourage students to critically reflect on contemporary dynamics and developments in the global economy - address key methodological challenges linking theory and empirical research for critical analyses.

Overall content

Modern mainstream economic theory is based on highly political assumptions, which are rarely challenged: dogmas of deregulation, mathematical models and austerity are treated as objective scientific facts, rather than ideological tools with a social and political history of their own. This course aims to repoliticize the study of economics and challenge the hegemony of neoclassical economic theory. This will be accomplished through a historical examination of the development of economic thought, and critical engagement with original economic texts. As such, the course objective is to understand the varied historical effect of these theories on both the object of study and the discipline itself.

The first part of the course “Economic Thought from Oikos to Economics” traces the history of economic ideas with an emphasis on critical and heterodox approaches. The individual sessions will introduce students to carefully selected primary literature from classical, critical and heterodox strands of economic thought. The objective is to understand the varied historical effect of these theories on both the object of study and the discipline itself. This will provide the foundation for further elaboration on contemporary issues such as debt, unemployment, inequality, and growth.

The second part of the course “Contemporary Challenges, Critiques and Alternatives” addresses present and pressing issues, through the lens of critical and heterodox political economy. This theoretical and applied pluralism will provide insights on issues such as e.g. the development crisis, financialisation, austerity politics and climate change, that are not conceptually possible if stricking to mainstream approaches. Through the employment of recent critiques, latter section of the course offers potential pathways towards different conceptualisations and alternatives to ‘the economy’ as we know it.

Expected work effort (ects-declaration)

For Master-Level Participants

Class teaching: 30 hours

Other (for example student presentations, exercises, peer-review): 50 hours

Preparation: 135 hours

Examination: 55 hours

Hours in total: 270 hours

Course material and reading list

The full course outline will be available on the course website in mid-April 2018. Course readings will be made available through a shared online repository. In the meantime, if you would like to read up in advance we recommend - Wood, E. M. (2002) The Origin of Capitalism. London. Verso. //this book is still one of the best and most concise introductions to capitalism and debates around it// - Chang, H.J. (2014) Economics: The User’s Guide. Pelican. // very accessible introduction into some of the core dimensions and concepts in (global) political economy // - Fine, B. & Milonakis, D. (2009) From Political Economy to Economics: Method, the social and the historical in the evolution of economic theory. London & New York: Routledge // thorough and critical overview of the trajectory of theory and methodology of economic thought // - Pradella, L. & Marois, T. (2014) Polarising Development: Alternatives to Neoliberalism and the Crisis. Pluto Press. //a wide range of contemporary developments in global capitalism, with particular focus on agency and spaces of resistance and alternatives// - Selwyn, B. (2013) The Global Development Crisis. Cambridge: Polity Press. //brings together some of the core theoretical perspectives of the course with a sharp discussion of contemporary challenges//

Also recommended if you would like to read up in advance

  • Fine, B. & Milonakis, D. (2009) From Political Economy to Economics: Method, the social and the historical in the evolution of economic theory. London & New York: Routledge // thorough and critical overview of the trajectory of theory and methodology of economic thought //
  • Pradella, L. & Marois, T. (2014) Polarising Development: Alternatives to Neoliberalism and the Crisis. Pluto Press. //a wide range of contemporary developments in global capitalism, with particular focus on agency and spaces of resistance and alternatives//
  • Selwyn, B. (2013) The Global Development Crisis. Cambridge: Polity Press. //brings together some of the core theoretical perspectives of the course with a sharp discussion of contemporary challenges//
Form of examination

For Master-level Participants.

The examination is in two parts:

1. Assignment written during the course.

The first part of the examination is an answer to a question handed out at the start of the course. The assignment is submitted during the final course session. The written assignment may not exceed 12,000 characters, including spaces (corresponding to five standard pages).

2. 48-hour written assignment.

The student is given 48 hours to write the second part of the examination. The assignment is set after the final course session. The assignment may not exceed 12,000 characters, including spaces (corresponding to five standard pages). The size of the assignments is based on 2,400 characters (incl. spaces) per page, excluding the front page, table of contents, bibliography and any appendices. Assignments will be refused examination if they exceed the maximum size, and one examination attempt will be deemed to have been used up.

A single overall grade is awarded. The two assignments have equal weight in the assessment.

Form of re-examination

Re-examination: Students who do not submit the first written assignment at the final course session must do so within two weeks of the end of the course. Re-examination of the 48-hour written assignment will take place during the re-examination period.

Examination type
Individual examination
Assessment
7-point grading scale
Moderation
None (i.e. course lecturer assesses)
Evaluation- and feedback forms

Feedback on 48hrs exam and newspaper assignment in office hour and or/email. Evaluation of course in final evaluation as well as concluding session.

The responsible course lecturer
Laura Horn (lhorn@ruc.dk)
Teacher
Jesper Jespersen(jesperj@ruc.dk)
Laura Horn(lhorn@ruc.dk)
Mikkel Flohr(mflohrc@ruc.dk)
Administration of exams
ISE Studieadministration (ise-studieadministration@ruc.dk)
STADS stamdata
Sommerskole
Belastning : 10 ECTS Aktivitetskode : U40639
Prøveform : Skriftlig (ut) Bedømmelse : 7-trinsskala Censur : Intern censur
Last changed 26/06/2018

lecture list:

Show lessons for Subclass: 1 PDF for print (1) Find calendar (1)

Monday 30-07-2018 10:15 - 30-07-2018 17:00 in week 31
Lecture 1; Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: Contradictions, critique and alternatives; The Emergence of

Tuesday 31-07-2018 08:15 - 31-07-2018 17:00 in week 31
Lecture 2; Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: Contradictions, critique and alternatives; Karl Marx and the Critique of Political Economy

Wednesday 01-08-2018 08:15 - 01-08-2018 17:00 in week 31
Lecture 3; Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: Contradictions, critique and alternatives; Capitalism and Ideology

Thursday 02-08-2018 08:15 - 02-08-2018 17:00 in week 31
Lecture 4; Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: Contradictions, critique and alternatives; The Marginalist Revolution: The Birth of Modern Economics & Keynes and the Post-Keynesian Counter Revolution

Friday 03-08-2018 08:15 - 03-08-2018 17:00 in week 31
Lecture 5; Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: Contradictions, critique and alternatives; The Marginalist Revolution: The Birth of Modern Economics & Keynes and the Post-Keynesian Counter Revolution

Monday 06-08-2018 08:15 - 06-08-2018 17:00 in week 32
Lecture 6; Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: Contradictions, critique and alternatives; Thorstein Veblen and Evolutionary Institutionalism

Tuesday 07-08-2018 08:15 - 07-08-2018 17:00 in week 32
Lecture 7; Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: Contradictions, critique and alternatives; Labour and Production

Wednesday 08-08-2018 08:15 - 08-08-2018 17:00 in week 32
Lecture 8; Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: Contradictions, critique and alternatives; Social Reproduction and Gender

Thursday 09-08-2018 08:15 - 09-08-2018 17:00 in week 32
Lecture 9; Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: Contradictions, critique and alternatives; Neoliberalism and Marketization

Friday 10-08-2018 08:15 - 10-08-2018 17:00 in week 32
Lecture 10; Summer school: Repoliticising capitalism: Contradictions, critique and alternatives; Development and its discontents

Friday 10-08-2018 17:00 - 10-08-2018 17:00 in week 32
Submission of written assignment

Monday 13-08-2018 10:00 - Wednesday 15-08-2018 10:00 in week 33
Exam: 48 hour written assignment

Friday 24-08-2018 10:00 - 24-08-2018 10:00 in week 34
Resubmission of written assignment

Monday 03-09-2018 10:00 - Wednesday 05-09-2018 10:00 in week 36
Re-exam